Thursday, 6 June 2019

The Self-Worth Analysis, Or How Neuropathy Can Steal Your Social Self


Allow me to imagine a scenario: You've been there before remember ... with HIV. The day before your diagnosis you were more or less a fully-functioning part of society, even if that wasn't particularly the aim and the day after ... you weren't. That's not to say that you ceased to exist; your role just changed that's all. It's a two-way process; society looks at you differently and you see society as something outside yourself. For many people, it's the first time they've been forced to examine their position in the world and for many people it's a real shock.

Many things you take for granted are changed forever by those three letters after your name. Even within your own subgroup of society; gay straight or whatever, you're seen as a different person after you become HIV positive. Unfortunately, it's a fact of life and we all have to get used to it. For some people it's an easier process than for others but eventually, we accept our new position in society and settle down, however uncomfortably, to get on with our lives.

So HIV bit a chunk out of your self-confidence and presented you with new challenges. These centered mainly on health and relationships. If you were lucky, your friends and family and partner stuck by you, or you found new ones without too much trouble. Again, if you were lucky, you moved on to the medication and your life also moved on in relative good health, towards a normal life expectancy. Many people are that lucky but equally many aren't and every set-back makes you realize that having HIV in your life makes you a different person. Yet however bruised, you're still standing. You're constantly reminded that twenty years ago you probably wouldn't have been but you're thankful for small mercies and that the virus can be suppressed.

Hello Neuropathy!
At the beginning, neuropathy doesn't seem so bad. A little numbness here, some tingling there; maybe some extra sensitivity or pain but generally it's something irritating that you can live with. You mention it to friends and doctors and reactions are pretty neutral and you go on with your life, a little concerned but not enough to keep you awake at night.

It's when (and if) it progresses that the problems start. Let's skip the progression details. If you're suffering from neuropathy, you know only too well how that goes and if you're looking for information, previous posts on this blog will help.

Neuropathy symptoms can end up being so severe that you are limited in what you can do in a way that you've never known before. Walking distances is a problem; sport and fitness exercises become difficult to impossible and your social life disappears like snowflakes in the sun.

Suddenly, you're once more confronted with feelings you thought you'd already overcome after you became HIV positive. You thought you'd been strong then and felt quite proud that you'd found a place for yourself in the world despite the stigmas and setbacks of HIV. Then along comes another disease which threatens to put your life on hold for an indeterminate time. Other people; even partners, family and close friends can't understand why you're suddenly morose and depressed. They put it down to the HIV, or the symptoms you're trying to describe which they also don't really understand and after a while, begin to lose sympathy and above all, patience.

What does that do to a person?
You begin to think you're stretching your credibility to breaking point. People with whom you have shared your HIV story over the years look at you with tired eyes; they've heard it all before and made enough allowances already ... or so it feels. You can't describe the sensations you're feeling because they're so difficult to put into words.

If you're in pain, you feel as though the whole world doubts you and you begin to re-tell the story about the boy who cries wolf, again and again in your mind. Worst of all, you begin to doubt yourself because there just doesn't seem to be any reason for the neuropathy. Okay you were never meant to die from having sex but at least you knew the reason for your HIV. Neuropathy, on the other hand, just seems like a cruel joke. If your doctor has also told you that you have idiopathic neuropathy but they can't find any reason for the nerve damage and it hardly shows up in the tests, you begin to feel like that person in a coma who is buried alive and can't move or say anything about it. You imagine hearing, "drama queen" being whispered behind your back and before you know it, the self-respect and feelings of self-worth that you fought so hard to maintain after the HIV diagnosis are gone again.

Now of course, not everyone with neuropathy and HIV suffers to this extent, but many do, and it affects every area of their lives. What people need from the medical profession for instance, is a pat on the back, a comforting word and some sustained moral as well as medical support. The problem is that very few in the medical profession know what it's like to have neuropathy themselves and nerve doctors are not paid psychologists, so they give you the cold, hard facts, put you on the first step of the medication windmill and abandon you to the psychological side-effects.

You then turn to your long-suffering friends, family and partners. It's not their fault either: how can they sympathize anything more than superficially, with something they've barely even heard of? You've already learned that patience and sympathy have limits and learning from experience has already taught you that you have to tone down the moaning or be faced with glassy stares and nodding heads. Neuropathy patients then begin to feel isolated and misunderstood. The more the disease progresses, the less they can do and their lives can grind to a frustrating halt.

For instance, no matter how old you are, when you're in constant discomfort or pain, your mind wants you to be as sexual as you always were but the body just won't let you. That in itself is a massive blow to the ego, especially for younger people but also for those who'd been looking forward to becoming sexual beings again after the traumas and complexes of HIV. Suddenly you start to think about how disabled you might end up being. You try this, that, or the other medication and/or supplement and while you might get some relief, nothing goes away permanently. No wonder people may become clinically depressed.

What people don't realize is how much of a shock neuropathy can be -- even to people who thought they knew what shock and awe was with HIV. It comes out of the blue; it's unexpected and seems just so unfair. Your life suddenly begins to shrink, imperceptibly at first but then at an alarming rate, until many end up lonely and socially detached, even though there may be people around them.

The disease is bad enough. It can end up being unbelievably painful at worst and unbelievably irritating at best but even greater than that, is the impact it has on a person's self-image, self-worth and self-confidence.

People have lived through this before, with the doubt and fear that they would be excluded from society by HIV; but the advent of neuropathy can attack an already fragile ego like rust on metal. It's an appropriate metaphor: rust implies that the original hasn't changed -- it's just been eroded and made imperfect to the point of no longer functioning properly.

That the world at large, and the HIV community in particular, is frequently not aware of neuropathy is both surprising and disappointing, and it needs to be addressed. People with neuropathy should only have to deal with the physical symptoms because psychologically and socially they're in safe hands -- if only! That said: if you're suffering ... you're not alone. Try to get in touch with someone else with the same problems. Supporting others is not easy, but a problem shared ...

This piece is written with all due respect to people living with HIV who also have hepatitis C, anal cancer or many other chronic conditions which are arguably more serious than neuropathy and have an even greater impact on their lives.
This and other posts are based on my opinions and impressions of living with both neuropathy and HIV. Although I do my best to ensure that facts are accurate and evidence-based, that is no substitute for discussing your own treatment with your HIV specialist or neurologist. All comments are welcome.

Tuesday, 26 March 2019

Internet Self Diagnosis? Almost Never A Good Idea

Today's post from themedium.ca (see link below) is one that warns against using Google etc to self-diagnose when you're experiencing unusual symptoms. The author is completely right...of course it's a problem if you diagnose yourself based on what the internet suggests and of course you need to take it to your doctor for confirmation...or not. That said, neuropathy patients for instance, are faced with a disease that has over 100 forms and over 100 causes and the symptoms can be just as varied. Their doctors don't always have the time to go into much detail about nerve damage, so it seems a sensible move to go to the internet to find out what's going on. However, it's a move filled with pitfalls and potential misinformation (never mind fake news!) but if you choose reputable sites and do your research via several sources, you'll probably find the information you need to explain some of the things happening to you. After that, it's time to go to the doctor with your findings. Needless to say, self diagnosis is one thing but self-medication is almost never a good idea - so many potential problems!! The fact is that most neuropathy sufferers are sensible people, so internet research has to be part of the equation but in partnership with the doctors, not just because you may disagree with them, or think they're not taking you seriously enough.

The dangers of self-diagnosing
Amrish Wagle Naairah Paurobally Mar 25, 2019

 
It is very common for people to turn to Google as a way of answering their pain or body-related questions, but this should not be the case

With Google at our fingertips, it feels downright irresponsible to not exploit this resource to self-diagnose one’s symptoms. With the time, energy, and effort one can spend to get an appointment for a limited time with a doctor, it seems far more convenient to Google away your biology. Unbeknownst to most, self-diagnosing consists of its own unique dangers that may end up causing more harm.

To start off, with the spectrum of illness and disorders one can contract, diagnosing requires a very keen eye for the nuances. As an example, patients with mood swings often assume they have a manic depressive illness when it could be a host of other things including major depression, bipolar disorder or seasonal affective disorder. The distinguishing requires a special attention to the quality of symptoms, such as how long the mood swings last and what type they are. The subtleties required in such self-diagnoses could significantly misdirect the patient as well as his clinician.

Another category of such a fallacy is the misinterpretation of psychological diseases with physical health issues. A tumor in the brain could just as easily cause psychological symptoms of depression or psychosis. Such misconceptions in extreme cases can be detrimental. Not to mention, many symptoms, especially visceral are not directly visible. Symptoms such as irregular heartbeats or hyperthyroidism when the body overproduces thyroid hormone. In this sense, self-diagnoses are quite superficial in identifying medical symptoms.

In addition, pain has a significantly poor correlation with tissue damage. Contrary to popular belief, pain is an experience in the brain and can be caused or perpetuated by mechanisms other than physical harm, such as neuropathy where nerve damage even after an injury has healed can persistently cause considerable pain. Another example is phantom limb pain, where following the amputation of a limb, the body continues to feel the excruciating pain of the missing limb even though it’s not there. In this sense, diagnosis of illness is a complex science that requires a deep competence simply not present in a casually superficial self-diagnosis. People also tend to frequently miss comorbidity, where two or more syndromes simultaneously exist within the same person.

Another danger of self-diagnosing is that a lot of people tend to exaggerate their illness. As an example, pain catastrophizing is a characteristic within people who tend to amplify their pain simply based on how they think about it. This is mostly based on their tendency to ruminate constantly and exaggerate their pain, coupled with a feeling of helplessness.

People also tend to prescribe their symptoms to more than one illness. Whereas depression can cause a host of other disorders including insomnia, anxiety and inattention, patients are usually predisposed to assigning these symptoms to separate syndromes such as ADD and sleep disorders.

This proves that patients can be too confounded with biases to make accurate self-diagnoses. Other than pain catastrophizing, patients can also lean towards downplaying their symptoms and minimize their perceptual effect in a state of denial. Individuals too busy or too nervous may avoid medical intervention and instead choose to carry on with their day.

There are legitimate syndromes that individuals usually tend to neglect simply because they are not quite disruptive in their lives. As an example, delusional disorders or personality disorders tend to go unreported as they are not problematic or overly psychotic enough for most people to seek conventional treatment.

Websites and search engines used for self-diagnosing are also based on algorithms that seek to get the most page views out of visitors. Consequently, the most serious types of ailments are provided at the top of the search results. People are naturally more likely to be engulfed by content on cancer than a simple headache. Research shows that these engines are not necessarily geared to provide the most accurate content and that individuals are more likely to walk away with significantly more dread that their symptom is a harbinger of something much worse. There is also a tendency to think that the top search results are more aligned with their symptoms than other illnesses.

Research also shows that few people use significant skepticism when consuming online content for self-diagnosis and roughly half of these end up consulting a doctor. Subsequently, most people tend to take matters into their own hands and try to treat their self-diagnosed illness.

The bottom line is that one should refrain from making significant changes in diet or medication without getting a clinician’s perspective. Self-diagnosing is only beneficial as a starting point and a doctor should be part of the conversation when proceeding to treat one’s health and wellness.

https://themedium.ca/sports/the-dangers-of-self-diagnosing/

Monday, 18 March 2019

Shoes For Nerve-Damaged Feet? Look No Further


Today's unbelievably extensive post from topshoeswomen.com (see link below) is not only a pretty accurate and well-explained description of neuropathy and how it affects us but a thorough examination of the shoe market for people living with neuropathy and some useful tips. if you think about it, our feet and legs have to carry us around and endure every form of movement you can think of, for all of our lives. It's a wonder we don't have foot problems in our twenties! If you then suffer nerve damage on top of all the other stresses and strains, it's our feet and legs that bear most of the strain and pain. It's vitally important then to buy the best footwear we can afford but that footwear needs to be appropriate for our very individual foot and leg problems. Buying over the internet is probably not a good idea, as you really need to try them on and walk around a bit before taking the chance on buying. This article provides a pretty good guide to everything 'neuropathic' feet related - well worth a read. And remember...fashion isn't an issue any more!!

The Top 10 Shoes for Neuropathy
By Nathan Max · On March 5, 2019 · Updated: March 7, 2019


Neuropathy is a condition suffered by almost 60% of the world’s population today.

Neuropathy is a very painful condition that affects mostly the lower limbs and feet. Wearing the correct footwear can reduce the pain and symptoms of Neuropathy enabling you to live a normal and healthy life.



 

What Exactly is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a disease or dysfunction of one or more of your peripheral nerves that can result in numbness, weakness, and pain. It could impact the sensory nerves, motor nerves, or even the autonomic nerves.

While it is a painful condition which could impact all parts of the body, it usually impacts the extremities such as your hands and feet.

Neuropathy can have a severe impact on the way that you walk and wear your footwear when it affects your feet and lower limbs.
Signs & Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy
Your feet may gradually become numb and you may have a prickling or tingling sensation in your feet or hands that may spread to the legs and arms eventually.
A sharp, jabbing, throbbing, freezing or burning pain sensation.
A more extreme sensitivity to touch.
A lack of coordination and balance that may cause falling.
Muscles can become weak or paralyzed if your motor nerves are affected.
If your autonomic nerves are affected you may develop a heat intolerance and suffer from bowel, bladder or digestive disorders.
Changes in blood pressure causing dizziness and lightheadedness may also occur when your autonomic nerves are affected.

Peripheral neuropathy has the ability to affect one nerve which is called mononeuropathy, two or more nerves in different areas called multiple mononeuropathies or many nerves in many areas referred to as polyneuropathy.

A good example of mononeuropathy is a condition called Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. In most cases where people have peripheral neuropathy, they have polyneuropathy.
 

The Different Types of Neuropathy

There are four different types of neuropathy;
 

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy is also called diabetic nerve pain and distal polyneuropathy. This is one of the most common forms of Neuropathy caused by diabetes that affects the nerves leading to your extremities such as feet, legs hands and arms.
 

Proximal Neuropathy

Proximal Neuropathy is also called Diabetic Amyotrophy and is a form of Neuropathy that causes muscle weakness.
 

Autonomic Neuropathy

Autonomic Nerves keep your body functioning normally and maintains your body’s homeostasis. Autonomic Neuropathy can affect many different systems of your body such as the digestive system or bladder.
 

Focal Neuropathy

All of the Diabetic neuropathy types are examples of polyneuropathy except for focal Neuropathy.

Focal Neuropathy affects only one specific nerve and comes on suddenly.

Focal Neuropathy often affects the nerves in the head particularly the ones going to the eyes and can also affect nerves in the torso or legs.
 

Causes Of Neuropathy

There are a few people for which there is no specific cause for their Neuropathic condition, this is known as Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy. Other causes of Neuropathy are as follows;
Diabetes is the most common cause when poorly treated because the high blood sugar levels causes damage to your nerves.
Some vitamin deficiencies such as B12 and Folate.
Certain drugs such as chemotherapy medication and HIV medicines.
Poisonous toxins such as constant contact with insecticides.
certain types of cancers such as Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma.
Drinking alcohol excessively.
Chronic kidney and Liver disease.
Certain injuries where you have to wear tight casts and bandages that put pressure on your nerves.
Infections such as HIV, Shingles and Lyme disease.
Connective tissue disease like Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Lupus disease.
Certain inflammatory diseases as well as some hereditary diseases.
 

Managing Neuropathy

Neuropathic pain can be treated with non-steroidal and anti-inflammatory drugs as well as Anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs in some cases.

Diabetes is a condition that is involved in Neuropathy, and by managing this disorder, you can also greatly alleviate the pain of Neuropathy.

With more severe and complicated cases a pain specialist may be required to use and an invasive or implantable device that will adequately control the pain.

Electrical stimulation of the nerves involved in causing the pain will help to reduce and manage the pain significantly.
Other Treatments for Neuropathy
Physical therapy
Counseling to manage pain.
Massage Therapy.
Acupuncture Therapy.
Exercise.
Using magnetic insoles orthotics.

Neuropathic pain does not respond well to standard pain treatments and may get worse rather than better over time.

A multidisciplinary approach where you combine therapies may be a much more effective way of controlling neuropathic pain.
 

Exercising for Neuropathy

The general benefits of aerobic and flexibility exercises are well known to most people and aid in increasing movement and your heart rate for a healthier lifestyle. Aerobic and flexibility exercises can be one of the most important treatments and health advantages for people suffering from peripheral neuropathy.

Physical activity improves your blood circulation and strengthens your nerve tissues by increasing the flow of oxygen to them. One of the biggest problems of neuropathy is reduced mobility which can result in muscular atrophy or shrink and tightening of the muscles as well as a decrease in metabolism which in turn reduces energy and cause weight gain.

Aerobic and flexibility exercising will improve your physical functioning, muscle flexibility, and strength as well as help you to maintain your weight and improve pain tolerance. In diabetics, aerobic exercises also aid in controlling blood glucose levels lowering your insulin requirements.


Neuropathy Affect on Feet and Legs

When you suffer from neuropathy, your feet and legs are usually affected first which is then followed by your hands and arms. Peripheral neuropathy causes numbness and a tingling, burning sensation in your feet and legs that usually becomes worse at night.

The most troublesome symptom of peripheral neuropathy is the lack of feeling in your legs or feet which increase your risk of injury and reduces your healing rate. Having feet that are numb also means you cannot feel cold or heat which may lead to feet overheating or suffering frostbite.

In general wearing, the correct footwear for neuropathy can protect your feet from injury, heat or cold where you are unable to feel as well as provide you with the right comfort and support.
 

Why Choosing Good Shoes Is Important

Neuropathy can bring changes to the form and functions of your foot that can lead to ulcers and foot deformities.

To reduce the damage that Neuropathy bring about and relieve the pain and symptoms, you will need specially adapted shoes for this condition.


Types of Footwear for Neuropathy

Walking is one of the best activities that are beneficial for your health and well-being and can also provide good results when you suffer from neuropathy or Diabetes.

Although when you have Diabetes, your Neuropathy one of the symptoms are reduced sensation in your feet making it very hard to know when your feet are injured, uncomfortable, overheating or cold. When you have impaired blood flow to your feet infections are harder to fight off, and your feet heal very slowly.

Most foot injuries can be prevented by wearing shoes that fit properly, and that provide appropriate support and protection against foot irritation, injury risks, and pressure points.
 

What To Look For

Shoes that have a roomy toe area and flexible fit with lightweight, breathable materials will keep your feet well ventilated and ensure a comfortable fit. Shoes for Bunions have a wider Toe box and more roomy fit in general and therefore are also a good choice for Neuropathy symptoms.

Padding where needed, as well as a cushioned insole or midsole, provides not only comfort but support as well. A moisture-wicking lining with antimicrobial properties will reduce your risk of infection and keep your feet odor free.

Lastly, a durable and thick outsole will protect you against punctures and provide excellent shock absorption.

Always remember to opt for a shoe that is seam free and does not irritate or chafe your skin which can cause blisters and infections. You can look at the Best Shoes for Diabetics which are also suitable if you suffer from Neuropathy.
 

Features of the Best Shoes for Neuropathy

In some cases, there is a complete loss of sensation in the foot which makes it difficult for the foot to protect itself by using pain as a warning. Therefore you need to make sure that your footwear is protective and a good fit, especially if you have other foot deformities.

Another symptom of Neuropathy is warm, dry skin. Therefore an insole that provides cushioned shock absorbency and evenly spreads pressure is required. Because of limited joint mobility, you will also need good shock absorbency through the heel, a sturdy outsole, rocker-bottom sole, and a pressure dispersing insole.

The most important aspect to take into consideration is to get a shoe that is suitable for the foot deformity or condition that has resulted from Neuropathy. Comfortable Walking Shoes can likewise be considered as a good choice for those who suffer from Neuropathy.
Reviews: Top Rated Shoes for Neuropathy

Below we have listed some of the best choices of shoes that are suitable for people who suffer from Neuropathy.

The chosen shoes will cater for most of the most common symptoms associated with Neuropathy.

1

Slip On Dress Shoe for Neuropathy

Eastland Yarmouth – Men























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Eastland Amore – Women























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The Eastland Amore and Eastland Yarmouth is a semi-formal shoe that can be worn casually and as a dress shoe that will give you a comfortable and flexible fit.
A custom fitting dual elastic gore for easy on and off in the Eastland Amore.
Smooth leather uppers and a soft sock lining that is gentle on your feet.
The footbed is well padded and gives excellent arch support.
The hand sewed Opanka stitch-to-sole construction provides a flexible and “no break-in” fit.
Long lasting and durable wear in a shoe that is comfortable and lightweight.
A shock absorbing polyurethane outsole that offers durability and excellent traction.
A slight heel for added support.
An excellent choice for a work shoe if you work in a professional environment.
Available in black and brown for the Amore and many different neutral colors for the Yarmouth Loafer.

2

Dress Sandal and Dress Shoe for Neuropathy

Naot Wisdom Flat – Men























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Naot Loop – Women























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The Naot Loop Dress sandal and Naot Wisdom Flat for men is a perfect choice for a night out or a day in the City. These shoes offer all the comfort features required for the symptoms of Neuropathy as well as a more narrow fit.
The inner sole is manufactured using cork and latex that is covered in leather with a microfiber center strip for comfort and support.
The upper of the Naot Loop for women consists of delicate leather straps that are gentle and non-irritating to the feet.
Adjustable Gore on both sides of the instep for a better fit.
A durable synthetic outsole.
Available in a slim or Medium fit.
The Naot Wisdom Flat for men has a padded technical lining in the front for enhanced comfort and dryness as well as hand-sewn strobe construction for flexibility and durability.

3

Neuropathy Sandals

Finn Tunis – Men























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Finn Sylt – Women























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The Finn Sylt and Finn Tunis is an orthopedic sandal designed to provide relief from all the symptoms resulting from Neuropathy and other foot conditions. A handmade slingback sandal that is extremely comfortable and durable for everyday wear.
Durable and soft leather uppers with a vegetable-tanned leather lining to help wick away moisture.
A shock-absorbing, removable, comfort footbed that is ergonomically designed to support and cushion your feet.
Adjustable straps that allow a more customized fit.
A stylish and fashionable design.
The footbed is curved with an orthopedic design to mold to your feet with every step.
A durable outsole that offers excellent support.
Available in a range of colors.

4

Comfortable Neuropathy Hiking Boots

Dr. Comfort Ranger – Men

















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Dr. Comfort Vigor – Women























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The Dr. Comfort Vigor and Ranger Hiking Boots are warm and comfortable boots that are perfect for both outdoors and indoors.
Manufactured from the finest quality soft and supple leather.
A lightweight shoe with comfort gel technology inserts and an elastic lace closure with Velcro straps for the most comfortable and snug fit.
The shoe cover and leather uppers have a seamless padded lining making these boots perfect for those who suffer from peripheral neuropathy.
Available in a few neutral colors as well as different width sizes.

5

Orthotic Breathable Sandals for Neuropathy

Orthofeet Melbourne – Men




















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Orthofeet Naples – Women

















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The Orthofeet Naples and Orthofeet Melbourne are lightweight and breathable orthotic shoes designed specifically to reduce the symptoms of neuropathy and provide support and protection required by this conditions as well as many other foot conditions.
A non-binding design with soft and smooth fabric uppers that are lined and padded with foam to eliminate pressure on pressure points and prevent chafing and blisters.
The extra depth and roomy toe box can accommodate foot conditions such as Bunions and Hammertoes and will provide ample toe wiggle room.
A multi-layered orthotic insole with anatomical arch support and a Gel padded heel seat will alleviate heel and foot pain as well as provide exceptional comfort and support.
The lightweight, smooth gait cushioned sole with Ergonomic-Stride design softens every step that you take and facilitates the natural motion of your foot which in turn alleviates stress on the joints of your feet.
Lastly, the durable outsole offers good grip and long-lasting wear.

6

Lightweight Slip-On Walking Shoe for Neuropathy

Skechers Go Walk 4 – Men























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Skechers Go Walk 4 – Women























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Lightweight, comfortable and easy to slip on and off, the Skechers Performance Go Walk 4 is an excellent choice in walking shoe if you suffer from Neuropathy or Diabetes.
Soft and flexible textile and mesh uppers that are very lightweight and non-irritating to sensitive feet because of the seamless construction.
The innovative and highly responsive 5GEN midsole provides excellent cushioning and shock absorbency.
A new Goga Max high rebound footbed energizes every step that you take fighting foot fatigue all the way.
A Bamboo lined footbed with anti-microbial treatment will reduce odor and prevent foot infections.
The durable rubber outsole provides exceptional grip and traction.

7

Therapeutic Casual Shoes for Neuropathy

Orthofeet Sprint – Men




















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Orthofeet Chattanooga – Women








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The Orthofeet Chattanooga and Orthofeet Sprint have an extra depth design to accommodates orthotics and for conditions such as hammertoes and bunions as well as many other comforts and support features to provide protection and pain relief for those who suffer from Neuropathy, Arthritis, and Diabetes.
A Non-Binding Relaxed fit for freedom of pressure points and extra depth to accommodate orthotic devices and provide ample room for movement.
Comfortable and breathable uppers for a flexible and comprehensive fit that will not chafe or irritate your feet.
The Gel Orthotic insole along with ergonomic cushioning facilitates natural movement, absorbs shock and provides cushioned comfort.
Designed to deliver comfort to extra sensitive feet and to reduce foot, heel, ankle and arch pain along with the symptoms of many other foot conditions the Orthofeet Chattanooga and Orthofeet Sprint is one of the best therapeutic and orthopedic shoes for neuropathy and other health conditions.

8

Diabetic and Neuropathy Symtom Casual Shoe

Dr. Comfort Carter – Men























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Dr. Comfort Marla – Women























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The Dr. Comfort casual shoe range that caters specifically for foot conditions and diabetic symptoms, is one of the best choices you can make if you suffer from Neuropathy.

These models offer protection as well as comfort features that cater specifically for the symptoms caused by diabetes and neuropathy.
Soft and seamless, stretchable Lycra uppers that are breathable, with a velcro strap for an adjustable fit.
A more roomy toe box, and available in wider widths.
The insole is plush, comfortable and supportive.
The outsole offers good grip and excellent shock absorbency.

9

Skechers Afterburn – Men























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Skechers D’Lites – Women























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I have always loved Skechers as a comfortable shoe, particularly because they generally have a wider and more flexible fit.

The models I have chosen are running and walking shoes with extra comfort and support features to protect your feet, as well as availability in wider widths to accommodate foot conditions.
The uppers offer a flexible and breathable fit with mesh construction and synthetic overlays.
The collar and tongue are padded for a more snug and comfortable fit.
A lace-up system allows you to adjust the fit of this shoe easily.
A comfortable and supportive memory foam insole.
The thick outsole is manufactured from high traction rubber.
The Skechers D’Lite features a very lightweight midsole.

10

Pain Relief Shoes for Neuropathy

Orthofeet Tacoma – Men














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Orthofeet Serene – Women











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The Orthofeet Serene and Tacoma are designed specifically for painful symptoms related to your feet, for those who suffer from Neuropathy, Diabetes, or flat feet and other foot conditions such as hammer toe and bunions.
A non-binding relaxed fit that does not aggravate or hurt pressure points on your feet.
Breathable and seam-free upper construction with a softly padded lining.
The plushly cushioned orthotic insole provides excellent stability and support while enhancing natural movement.
A thick shock absorbing, durable outsole, that ensures good grip.
Extra depth and wider width to accomodate foot conditions.

Each of the discussed shoes offers a number of characteristics to relieve and reduce the symptoms and results caused by Neuropathy. We have given you a variety to choose from casual to dress shoes. The symptoms of Neuropathy should no longer hold you down; there is a perfect shoe for you!


Index Table: The Best Shoes for Neuropathy

1

Eastland® - Slip On Dress Shoe for Neuropathy






Slip-On
Cushioned Insole
Flexible
No Break In

Eastland

95



2

Naot® - Dress Sandal and Dress Shoe for Neuropathy






Narrow and Medium Fit
Latex and Cork Insole

Naot

90



3

Finn® - Neuropathy Sandals






Leather Upper
Curved Footbed
Orthopedic Design

Finn

97



4

Dr. Comfort® - Comfortable Neuropathy Hiking Boots






Wider Widths
Lightweight
Adjustable Fit

Dr. Comfort

90



5

Orthofeet® - Orthotic Breathable Sandals for Neuropathy






Cushioned Insole
Arch Support
Gel Padding

Orthofeet

94



6

Skechers® - Lightweight Slip-On Walking Shoe for Neuropathy






Goga Max Footbed
Cushioned
Lightweight
Rubber Sole

Skechers

96



7

Orthofeet® - Therapeutic Casual Shoes for Neuropathy






Gel Cushioning
Non-Binding Fit
Breathable

Orthofeet

95



8

Dr. Comfort® - Diabetic and Neuropathy Symtom Casual Shoe






Seamless
Flexible
Breathable
Orthotic Insole

Dr. Comfort

98



9

Skechers® -






Flexible
Breathable
Lightweight
Cushioned

Skechers

9



10

Orthofeet® - Pain Relief Shoes for Neuropathy






Cushioned
Orthotic Insole
Pain relief

Orthofeet

9


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